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the answers. two important people missing from this conversation. >> steve: brand new data. best and worst states for your money. exclusive results are still ahead on this program, mr. kilmeade. >> brian: is the reason you are single because you travel too much. love may be in the air. a new website helping you to find love in the airport. >> steve: stand by. >> brian: "fox and friends" starts right now. ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> steve: finally something to do in the airport. >> brian: well, when you are delay if you are single. >> gretchen: i hate to bring it up so early in the morning there are a lot of jokes about hooking occupy airplanes. 92 this is the terminal and on the ground. >> gretchen: in the club. >> steve: it is different. if you ever spent time all by yourself in the airport and you are single this will appeal to you f. you have somebody who travels a lot. why don't they do it at the airport. >> gretchen: if you are married you will hate this dating site, there could be other hook ups with married people. >> brian: i have an admiral pass in my pocket. who is with me. mea
the conversation with dana and steve. what else we got going on? >> we're going to check on global markets. we are a bit above fair value here, about 8 points. 2 on the nasdaq and the tp would open -- so would you say that's mixed, right? >> i'd say barely bunch oiged. >> what are we waiting for? >> monday for the holidays to be over. a shortened trading day. europe is down just barely. and asia, which has been trading for quite a while longer here, authorize's they're up a little bit. now let's take a look at oil. it's down a little bit. brent right around the 110 mark people have been watching. natural gas down, as well. and the ten year, my favorite gauge, 1.673. nothing's changed. the dollar, what's happening with the dollar here? 1.28. a little more strength -- not much really. >> although that's a stronger euro. big story has been the dollar-yen. some sense that there will be serious spending out of japan. finally, gold. a measure of a lot of things here. up five bucks. time for the global markets report and we have ross westgate standing by in london. any news out of mario draghi in. >>
flights in the windy city. hundreds of others was delayed. what is the situation there now? steve brown life at chicago o'hare. steve? >> hey there, yes. a little better. they managed to get the fog burned off by noon. still had to work through the difficulties there are fewer flights and fewer seats. if there is a problem with delays or cancellations you have fewer seats to move people to get where they are going. in the midwest is where you have most difficulty. the vast majority of folks traveling with the holiday weekend will do so by car. a good news bad news situation there. the price of gasoline has been drop something a few cents less than beginning of the month. few more dollars in your pocket. right? compared to last thanksgiving, it is a couple of cents more. about five or six, seven more. depending where you're at. it's going to cost you more to travel. as you pointed out, triple a says more folks traveling on the road. there is a pentapody mand. put off a trip to grandmother's house in 2011 and decided to in 2012. there will be folks on the roads driving; particularly, busy
the reproductive billionaire guys because of everything they do for us. if you look at what steve jobs has done for us, what bill gates has done for society, the government ought to pay them. why do they collect money from bill gates and steve jobs for what they contributed? is ridiculous. he also talked about the 47% and how dangerous they are. just a reminder that that is a very familiar concept. these are the attitudes and ways of thinking, in a way paradoxically, meredith kranick, working superrich, there is a more fragile connection to the middle-class man in the prior age. in conclusion, i just wanted to take us all for one moment to venice in the 14th century. in the fourteenth century, the beginning of the fourteenth century, venice was one of the biggest cities in europe, one of the biggest and richest and that is remarkable. if you have ever been there, geographically is such a crummy place. foggy, mosquito ridden, lagoons, very hard to build and the reason the italian ended up there was the hon is chased them off of the good land. here it was, incredibly rich and powerful state sendi
billionaire guys because of everything they do for us. look at steve jobs, bill gates the government ought to pay them. why they collect money for what they have contributed? he also talks about the 47% and how dangerous they are. so that is a very familiar concept. in a way that this super rich and the way it feels that there is a more fragile connection but in conclusion i just want us for one moment to put this in the 14th century. then this was one of the biggest cities did europe. that is remarkable. geographically it is such a yucky place. foggy, the speedos, lagoons, the only reason the italians ended up there they were chased off. is incredibly rich state sending traditions to china controlling demands and how did they do it? this fabulous rise to the most economic open system of that time. with a particular form of contract system if you would take on risk if he did not have capital you could share in the deal with a partner did and go on a mission the guy who did not have capital to risk his life but share of the profits. this was the reason you had the wealth of that is. but in
to bailout yet another housing agency. that's what it looks like. here now is steve maister managing partner at maister selig and fine. welcome back, steve. this is the federal housing administration, right? fha. they are short, you tell me, they are short $56 billion in reserves. that's to me, puts them on the edge. bankruptcy. >> that's right. there's no question as taxpayer bailout coming here. look, the government, obama administration just loves sub prime mortgages. this whole enterprise, this fha, is really a garner to of sub prime mortgages and taxpayers are going to pay big time larry. >> as though we haven't learned anything from $140 billion bailout of fanny and freddy. correct me if i'm wrong, but 40%, roughly, 40% of the loans that they insured just under the last year or two, have been sub prime loans. they haven't learned a thing. >> they haven't learned a thing. or maybe they just don't care. but yes, you're absolutely right. 40% sub prime loans. moreover what it is, is people who have gone through one, sometimes two foreclosures, bankruptcies and have razor thin down payments
things are getting a bit tougher. let's bring in david and steve. happy thanksgiving, guys. thanks for getting up early with us. >> good morning. >> first one to you, david, the staffers have told politico that these talks are off to a rough start and issue is, it's the same, the revenue, how to get it. what congressman tom cole said on "jansing and company" yesterday. >> important as to how you get that revenue. i was disappointed to see leader pelosi say it had to be higher rates or nothing. i don't think that's the way you begin a negotiation. >> what about the possibility of keeping the same rates but eliminating deductions for the wealthy in. >> i think that's a good potential suggestion. >> so you hear that, republicans have opened the door to revenue but not by raising taxes. is that going to be enough? might that be the compromised point? >> if you listen to the white house and top democrats it might not be, because they're saying, i think treasury secretary geithner said the other day that's not enough money. president obama starting negotiations at $1.6 trillion in revenu
at this point. >> reporter: one of the speakers constituents, steve hightower, has a petroleum distribution business, like the economy is doing well. he has known boehner for years and believes the speaker wants to make a deal with president obama to avoid the fiscal cliff and impact on families but also seen washington's disfunction and has his doubts. >> somewhat just like the president, time to go ahead and do your job. >> reporter: speaker boehner is secure enough in his own district here north of cincinnati i-75 that his constituents will give him a freehand to negotiate. his bigger challenge is pulling together republicans from districts across the country behind any deal he ultimately strikes with president obama. the next four weeks that is the challenge john boehner, eric canter, and candidates on the house and senate are going to find. how do you put together a deal that not only the leaders agree upon but members of the caucuses can give majority to us in both houses? >> indeed, john, thank you very much. >>> meantime, some important economic data came out today and if you were l
about as remote as you can get. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. we live on an increasingly endangered planet, from the glaciers of antarctica to the rich prairie lands of canada. and the ultimate disaster may be financial as well as environmental. later in this episode, scott pelley reports from antarctica on the wide-ranging effects of global warming. and later bob simon has a story from canada on the environmental damage caused by the next great oil rush. but our first story involves a controversial waste product that could have damaging effects on the environment. there are more than 600 coal-fired power plants generating electricity in the u.s., and those plants produce 130 million tons of waste called coal ash. it contains concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic materials. and as lesley stahl first reported in 2009, when coal ash is dumped into wet ponds--and there are more than 500 of those across the country-- the result can have an enormous health risk on the people living in nearby communities. >> we get about 48%, nearly half o
to hand over to the dominical steve clemons, who is moderating the session. >> thank you so much. it's great to be with all of you. we have a fantastic panel. we have kazuyuki yamazaki, part of japan's ministry of foreign affairs and we have the undersecretary of defense for policy, jim miller, and then we have the editorial director of india today, and a very big star blasters program, i enjoyed our encounter last year and expects similar feistiness, m.j. akbar. finally, we have paul madison, who is commander of the navy. thank you for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me and i went online to find a chinese event is being held right now. there are no canadians, japanese, americans, on this panel. we don't have any chinese today, but we should have a lot of fun discussing strategy in asia pacific region with china, but i also want to acknowledge that that voice may not be with us today, but that could be giving us room to run. i went to china and visited with the ministry of foreign affairs and i met with their director
. the california voters have already spoken. today steve cohen, friend of our show, democrat from tennessee the first district there said this in "the washington post" in an op eth. we ask that your departments take no enforcement action against anyone who acts in compliance with the laws of colorado, washington and any other states that choose to regulate access to marijuana for medicinal or personal use. it is not just the elected officials or the liberals. you have people who were in law enforcement, law enforcement against prohibition. this is the leap letter. after 40 years of the drug war people no longer look upon law enforcement as heroes but as people to be feared. this is particularly true in poor neighborhoods and those people of color and -- and those of people of color and it impacts our ability to fight real crime. i'm joined with michael tricia, ana and we invite a criminal defense. sara, what happens? how does this work if there's a federal -- one federal law but the state makes up a law in colorado, the peop
the company from several angles. i heard 675 as target. not sure if that's right. >> upswing coming. steve is an old friend of mine. good time to add position. valuation low. earnings momentum. how many citigroup analysts does it take to change -- that's a different piece of research. i do believe that apple is that sweet spot where people are saying that sell-off finished and maybe all of the big selling is done. i don't know how far i can go. i just think that in the end they did miss two quarters. they have to make this quarter. i don't know. they have to make it. >> if it were a man, you say he's not the same man as he was before? apple. if the stock were a person? >> more of an aaron rodgers than eli manning. >> that's not good in light of last night. >> only as good as your last game. >> manning didn't look that great. >> listen, eagles play the carolina panthers. do you want me to -- could you lend me eli tonight? >> who is the starting quarterback for the eagles? >> that's what they're trying to figure out themselves. >> this is far field. >> maybe they'll take smith over there. >>
communicate with strategic a fact. i think you touched, steve, on an important piece which is the superiority conflicts, if i can put it that way. china fell to they were abused by major powers through the 19th century and well into the 20th century. that has an interesting counterbalance, which as they seem to have a bit of a superiority complex about the solutions they are building about how china emerges as a global power. this containment peace is a bit of a challenge. the entire challenge their -- the chinese are making claims with respect to the sea are fairly outrageous. what they're looking for at the end of the day, i think, is respect -- respect at the table and for who they are and what they're doing. somehow we need to find the means to bring these two solitudes together. at the end of the day, any conflict, whether it is kinetic or otherwise, that affects the flow of trade through that part of the world will have an impact globally. >> it is doing it now with china and japan. you have to of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises the fundamental qu
education network. building on steve's question, it strikes me that it doesn't necessarily need to be a federal role in promulgating standards, that these can be voluntary standards, for local education funds, this was a voluntary adoption profit says -- adoption process based on the standard of good conduct and their management. but there is a critique of year in the for-profit world historically that i wonder if it is standard -- that i wonder if standards or another mechanism can address. in the charter world where you have an independent chartering authority that grants a charter to a for-profit school but takes it out from under the public '. this school board, the elected officials does not have a -- does not have the ability to pour -- to pull the charter. perhaps there will be an analogous critique. i wonder if standards or other mechanism is a way to address that critique? you talk about accountability in terms outcome measures and so on, but the broader critique about governance, i wonder about that. >> i think the governor and its -- i think the government's question
.? >> amanda brown with public education network. building on steve's question, it strikes me that it doesn't necessarily need to be a federal role in promulgating standards, that these can be voluntary standards. for local education funds, this was a voluntary adoption process based on the standard of good conduct and their management. but there is a critique of the for-profit world historically that i wonder if standards or another mechanism can address. in the charter world, where you have an independent chartering authority that grants a charter to a for-profit school, but takes it out from under the public -- this school board, the elected officials do not have the ability to pull the charter. perhaps there will be an analogous critique. i wonder if standards or other mechanisms is a way to address that critique? you talk about accountability in terms outcome measures and so on, but the broader critique about governance. i wonder about that. >> i think the government's question is an important one, by and large, but different states do charters operating differently, there is still som
. going off the fiscal cliff, some democrats are saying that the possibility and wouldn't be so bad. steve, on our line for republicans, what do you think? caller: i totally agree with the caller from texas who said that we should return to the clinton era tax law. just think of that era we had. we had a budget surpluses. and we had a winning prosperity. i do not think we need to fear returning to the clinton tax law. and as the caller said from texas, the democrats have demonized the bush tax cuts. and so we will see with the demon is. the 47% who do not pay income tax from about 30% of them will return to the tax rolls. and at least the pain is like to be spread around here to everybody. and i find the connection of the grover norquist problem is that if we returned to the clinton tax law, then everybody next year will just want to reduce taxes and the republicans will be free to vote for those things without the pledge interfering with that. i think what would solve that issue as well. so i think we would all be a lot better off. more dollars over 10 years. and it would come from every
point that steve rattner made over the weekend which is all the guys and the women i know on wall street, none of them have ever become less energetic, less workaholics because of the capital gains rate at 25%. >> or 39.6%. >> hey, can i ask you about that, because -- help me understand this. we have a lot of people talking about how we need to 0 raise more taxes. >> sure. >> and i hear -- i hear the president talking about moving the top tax rate up to 39.6%. and i'm just wondering, is that as equitable an approach when a lot of really rich guys and women look at that 39.6%? right now i'm never going to pay that. >> yeah. >> would it be better to raise the capital-gains tax and say 15 to 20 or 15 to 25 percent would that help with income disparity a bit more? >> well, that's why i suggest a minimum tax, because you're absolutely right. of the 400 highest incomes in 2009, which average $200 million apiece, a quarter of the people paid at a rate under you 15%. so the only way to get it back is to have a minimum tax. >> how many of those would you bet, if you had to make a bet, paid 39.6%?
. steve jobs said why would i wait for a focus group to tell me what people want that don't even know what they want until i give it to them and that's what's happened to the holidays. >> people wanting to shop at 5:00 a.m. on thanksgiving they wouldn't be there. >> but it got created and then the frenzy started. >> i want to get to our next topic, medical marijuana and kids. a 7-year-old being treated for an aggressive form of leukemia. she has been given by her doctor medical marijuana and takes it in bill former single day. this goes to our doctor, whether you think it's advisable for kids to be taking marijuana for medical purposes. >> i have no problem with a child dying africanser getting some relief from nausea, vomiting. >> 75% of surviving. >> and therein lies the rub. one of the parents said that she credited the marijuana with saving her daughter's life and being part of the cure. there is no evidence for that. so i think, you know, sort of the -- the blank statement, is it okay for 7-year-olds? you have to break this down case by case by case. >> and aren't there other medicati
, of which i have been privileged to be a leader with steve smith in new jersey, having a press conference with dr. j. because we found that using blood cord stem cells had been applied to some people with success, including, i believe, some in this nation who suffer from sickle cell anemia. forgetting totally about adult stem cell the -- stem cells, the week the nobel prize committee announced the prize to the two sign tiffses who had unlocked the key in the ability to take adult stem cells and reprogram them back to induced pleni potent cells meaning they had the ability to become like embryonic cells. and just weeks before they had cured a disease in dogs using cells from the dog's nasal passages. there can be a legitimate debate about the moral and ethical concerns surrounding stem cell research and embryonic stem cell research but to have an ad that reduces it to the question of whether a 5-year-old can look in the camera and say, why does this congressman want me to die? how does that elevate the debate? how does that in any way enhance our ability to make very difficult decisions? d
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)